Project Knitting: Izzie’s Workshop

One of the goals I set at the beginning of the year was tackling an ambitious knitting project. Considering I’ve been leveling-up with the garter stitch over the past year (and made my first baby blanket), it only made sense to challenge myself.

What I had in mind at the time: learning to purl and completing a pattern requiring purl and knit stitches.

What I actually did: opened an Etsy shop for my knitting, Izzie’s Workshop.

My stash of completed hats and headbands have come in handy, and so the shop is stocked at the moment. But it still looks pretty bare, which means I’m already raiding my yarn trunk to find anything pretty while also trying to figure out what to knit. I want to have an eclectic mix of items for sale and not just hats and headbands. I’m thinking scarves and baby blankets and shawls and cowls. Maybe cardigans and sweaters eventually.

The challenge now is avoiding Michaels and AC Moore until I put a significant dent in my yarn stash. LikeĀ can see the wood bottom of the trunk-sized dent. If I knit as much as I plan to, that should happen sooner rather than later.

I’d appreciate it if you’d check out Izzie’s Workshop and give us a follow on Instagram and Twitter. Those second two will feature new items and sales in addition to cute dog pictures and knitting updates.

Project Quilt: Two Steps Forward & One Step Back

Quilting is like any other big project: you really should prepare before jumping in with both feet. That means buying and preparing the fabric, learning to use my sewing machine, figuring out the parts of a quilt and how to put one together. (And holy crap, putting together even a throw-size quilt is going to be a project and a half.)

Since this is my first quilt project ever, I decided not to spend a lot of money on fabric. A yard of fabric at a craft store is at least $7; meanwhile, I can pick up a set of three sheets for no more than $10 at Goodwill. And those three sheets will be more than enough for the majority of the quilt. I may need a couple pillowcases or another sheet eventually, but those are easy enough to pick up.

Learning how to assemble a quilt has been eye-opening. On some level, I recognized that quilting is a project. However the realization of having to cut HOW MANY squares and all the measuring and probably getting stabbed with LOTS of pins hit me hard. I’m still going to make this quilt. I’m actually glad that I know how much work will be involved, so I won’t become disheartened when I’m not making progress as quickly as I’d like.

Everything seemed to be progressing apace. I even pulled the sewing machine off the shelf in my closet, chiseled the Styrofoam off it, and poured over the instructions (which made close to no sense). A couple YouTube videos later, and I successfully threaded the needle and the bobbin. I even used it to sew a pair of rice-filled ice packs. Then I decided to make a pair of handkerchiefs. I pinned the seams in place rather than iron them flat, and the needle on the machine hit the head of a pin and that little plastic pinhead bent the needle. I’m still not even sure how plastic won i that battle.

I replaced the needle but couldn’t pick up the bobbin thread. So the sewing machine is sitting in my living room until I have the time to re-thread the machine with hopefully better thread tension (because I heard that might fix it?). Until I figure that out, this project isn’t exactly on hold. I can still measure and cut fabric squares; I can figure out how the pattern should look. The pause button has just been hit on assembling everything.