March Reading Recap

Yes, it’s April. And yes, I’m just now posting my reading recap for March. Things have been more than a little hectic, and this blog has fallen by the wayside. But I’m getting my feet back under me–slowly but surely–and getting back into the groove.

So without further preamble, here we go.The first book of March was Blackfish City by Sam J. Miller. I’d seen hype about it on Twitter and bought the eBook when it went on sale. It’s set in the future with several science fiction elements (or maybe not because hey, it’s the future) after Earth has succumbed to climate change. The characters are engaging and worth reading about; however, the world building–while necessary–bogged me down.

Next up was Witchmark by C.L. Polk, which I received from Tor Publishing’s as part of their monthly free eBook when you subscribe to their newsletter. As opposed to Blackfish City, this book built its world without being overwhelming. It draws on the general idea of Edwardian life after a World War. The characters are also fascinating; I’m seriously thinking about getting book 2 when it comes out.

The final one was Mrs. Martin’s Incomparable Adventure by Courtney Milan. I picked up this novella ARC as part of the pre-release publicity. It’s a sweet, fluffy story about two elderly women making a middle-aged man (Mrs. Martin’s nephew) absolutely miserable. There’s enough conflict to move the story along without pushing it out of fluff territory.

What did you read in March? Anything that I should check out?

 

 

Three Things That’ll Make Me Put Down a Book (For Good)

I used to hate the idea of not finishing a book. HATED it. I’d slog through books that made me want to bang my head against the wall because I thought it was another notch on my bookshelf.

Now, I’m pretty discriminating in what I read. If I’m not enjoying a book, I’ll put it down. Simple as that.

But the writer in me has recently decided that it might be a good idea to figure out what it is about a book that makes me put it down. Then I’ll be able to use that knowledge towards my own stories. And hopefully prevent readers from putting my books down.

While there are a million reasons for me not to like a story, I found three consistent reasons for me to let a book gather dust on my bookshelf.

 

1.  It lacks tension
Tension makes the story go ’round and keeps me turning the page even though it’s well past my bedtime. Tension comes from the uncertainty of a character achieving their goal by the end of the story. When failure’s a very real option and the character has a stake in the story ending a certain way, it drives the reader and the story forward. Without it, the story falls flat.

2. There’re more info dumps than story lines
Sometimes it’s okay to tell readers snippets of the story rather than show them if showing will slow things down. But too much information–whether its background on a particular character or information on a historical event–can bog the story down. It can take the reader out of the story and even bore them.

3. It’s just not for me
One reader is inherently different from another. And while readers will enjoy a number of the same books (that’s how authors sell books to more than just their friends and family), they’re going to have differing opinions on books. Not every book is going to click with every reader. It’s normal. It’s okay.

What I’ve Been Reading… January 2017

6617104Persuader by Lee Child
~Jack Reacher is tasked by the DEA to rescue their agent from an undercover mission gone wrong.
This was the first Reacher book written in first person that I’ve read. It humanized Reacher, which was a different experience than his “mysterious stranger” aura and raised the stakes. I actually doubted his ultimate success more than once.

15790895The Shambling Guide to New York City by Mur Lafferty
~Zoe Norris thought finding a job in New York City was tough, but surviving her coworkers and the new world of the undead.
I loved how Zoe interacted with the fantastic creatures from the very beginning. Plus the mix of absurdity, humor, and tension made it tough to put this book down. It’s guaranteed that I’ll be reading the second Shambling Guide book.

31423215Taking the Titanic by James Patterson & Scott Slaven
~A pair of thieves pose as newlyweds aboard the Titanic to pull off the biggest heist of their lives.
Despite a slow start, the story eventually picked up to become interesting. There were a number of subplots, and the historical elements felt genuine to the story. My one complaint was that the end was pretty unrealistic.

23308084The Rose and the Dagger by Renee Ahdieh
~After being separated from Khalid, Shahrzad must figure out two things: how to break the curse and get back to her husband.
I knew that I wanted to read this book as soon as I finished The Wrath and the Dawn. It was just as good as the first book, with fantastic romance and plenty of action. Plus the ending was absolutely perfect.

29214703Let’s Play Make Believe by James Patterson and James O. Born
~Divorcees Christy and Martin embark on a wild, romantic game of make-believe that won’t end well.
The best part of this novella was that it didn’t feel like a novella. It was intense from the very beginning, and I didn’t see the twist coming.

23341259Violent Ends by Shaun David Hutchinson (Editor), Kendare Blake, Steve Brezenhoff, Delilah S. Dawson, Trish Doller, Margie Gelbwasser, E.M. Kokie, Cynthia Leitich Smith, Tom Leveen, Hannah Moskowitz, Elsa Nader, Beth Revis, Mindi Scott, Neal Shusterman, Brandon Shusterman, Courtney Summers, Blythe Woolston, and Christine Johnson
~It only took twenty-two minutes for Kirby Matheson to change his high school forever, but it took a whole lot longer than that for him to become a monster.
This book was nearly impossible to put down, and it painted a multi-dimensional picture of Kirby and the others impacted by a school shooting.

What I’ve Been Reading… December 2016

I embarked on the Goodreads Challenge this year (like I have the past few years) and decided to read 30 books. I read 52 books the past couple years, but I knew that there’d be far too much happening–between moving and everything else–to realistically read a book a week. Thanks to cramming three books into my head the last week of December, I officially completed the challenge!

32370233The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh
~Shahrzad must enchant Khalid–her husband and the Caliph of Khorasan–with stories night after night if she hopes to stay alive.
This book is one part “Beauty & the Beast” and one part “A Thousand and One Arabian Nights”. The characters–along with their different agendas–jumped off the page, making me want to pick up book 2.

28186322A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourn
~Veronica Speedwell finds herself inexplicably bound to a boorish natural-historian named Stoker to solve a murder and the mystery of her past.
I’m a sucker for historical mysteries, especially if they’re set in Victorian England. This one also had a badass female lead and a compelling male sidekick.

23719489Arsenic in Assinippi by John F. Gallagher
~A non-fiction book about the trial of Jennie May Eaton for her husband’s murder.
Though obviously well-researched, this book was a bit dry for my tastes. But it was still a fantastic study of a high-profile trial that took place near my hometown in Massachusetts.

24885744Mockingbird by Chuck Wendig
~Miriam Black must track down a serial killer before he starts killing teen girls.
Miriam Black is one of my favorite anti-heroes, and the only anti-heroine that I can recall coming across. There’s such a frantic energy that follows her–and the story–throughout the 300 or so pages, making it easy enough to read in a day.

21848263The One You Want by Gena Showalter
~Kenna Starr wants nothing more than to overcome her reputation in her small town, but heartthrob Dane Michaelson’s arrival in town throws a wrench in her plans.
This had everything that I could ever want from a contemporary romance: a sweet heroine, a smoldering hero, and a sappy ending. It’s a novella (only 109-ish pages), so it’s a quick read.

 

 

What I’ve Been Reading Lately…

I’ve gotten into the habit of always keeping a book in my purse, which means I’m getting a whole lot more reading done. Before work. During lunch. Even for an hour before bedtime. Here’s what I’ve read over the past few weeks.

30269117Inferno by Dan Brown
~Robert Langdon wakes up in an Italian hospital with no memory and a military force chasing him for a secret only he can unravel.
Short chapters, multiple points of view, and the premise made for an entertaining read. However I was pretty disappointed with the ending. For a book with so much promise, it felt like a cop out.

 

6979934

The Man from Hell by Barrie Roberts
~Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson must untangle a web of lies and tragedy to catch Lord Blackwater’s murderer.
This felt like a classic Sherlock Holmes story, written in the same style as the canon. And as a history nerd, I was hooked on the chapters depicting life penal colony Australia.

 

27983358In Too Deep by Sherry D. Ficklin
~Farris is willing to write off a classmate’s death as suicide until she gets a cryptic note that begs her to find the killer.
This book was an impulse buy on my Nook, even though I wasn’t necessarily interested in continuing with the #Hacker series after reading the first book earlier this year. I’m glad that I did since this book became very, very hard to put down.

 

15396970Lock and Key by Sarah Dessen
~Ruby has only been able to rely on herself through most of her life, but can she change now that her sister and brother-in-law are giving her a future?
I love every Dessen book that I’ve ever picked up, and this book wasn’t any different. In addition to making characters deal with pretty big issues, Ruby’s journey was engaging from the first page.

 

10869746Rise of the Governor (The Walking Dead #1) by Robert Kirkman and Jay Bonansinga
~Brian Blake knows that his brother, Phillip, is the only reason he’s survived so far, but he soon sees how the zombie apocalypse is changing his brother.
The Governor is my favorite Walking Dead character, despite being off-his-freaking-rocker. I loved seeing into both Brian’s and Phillip’s psyches, and the ending was fantastic.

The Book Rules

Rule 1
Never regret staying up late to read a book. Call it a bad decision in the morning when you’re struggling against a sleep-fogged brain, but never regret it. Because if reading makes you happy, then you should never regret a moment of it.

Rule 2
Avoid starting a new book after 8 PM. Stories are supposed to get their claws in and not let you go, and it’s 2 AM before you know it. Feel free to ignore this rule on weekends or holidays. Or whenever.

Rule 3
When the price of an eBook and a paperback are close–and you can afford it–spring for the paperback. There are few things better in this world than being the first person to crack open a brand new book and stick your nose between the freshly printed pages.

Rule 4
Carry a book at all times: in a purse, on a phone, etc. You never know when you could be stuck waiting, and the articles in magazines left on waiting room tables are never as interesting as they seem.

Rule 5
Anything flat–or mostly flat–can be used as a bookmark. Those old Pokemon cards lying around, that receipt tucked into the bottom of a plastic bag, and the decal that never made it onto your car.

Rule 6
Bookmarks bought at bookstores or in souvenir shops never actually get used in books. Your inclination with something so pretty and shiny is to keep it in its plastic so that the edges don’t fray and the cardstock doesn’t bend. Metal bookmarks are the exception.

Rule 7
Splurge on autographed editions. With signed books becoming a new norm in bookstores and other retailers, they’ve never been easier to find. Far easier than hoping the author will be doing a signing within a reasonable distance from home.

Spring 2016 Book Haul

It seems that I buy books in fits and bounds. After several months of not buying much of anything, I’ll add half a dozen new titles to my shelves over the course of two months. And that’s exactly what happened. So I figured I’d use it as an excuse to do a big book haul. Most of these books came from Barnes & Noble, though I did get a signed hardcover from the Poisoned Pen based out of Arizona.

Wicked as They Come by Delilah S. Dawson
Vampires plus steampunk plus carnival. That’s what I’ve gathered Wicked as They Come is about from the summary and chatter online. Plus there’s a pretty cool inter-dimensional travel component to it, too. It’s been on my to-buy list for a while, and I’ve been looking for an excuse to order it. Pushing an online B&N order over the $25 threshold for free shipping proved to be the perfect opportunity.

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins
Author Kameron Hurley highly recommended The Library at Mount Char, and the summary gave me the impression that it’s right up my alley. Murder and secret societies–what’s not to like? The paperback also recently came out, so it was on sale. Unfortunately I’m thinking it’s too high-fantasy for me after reading twenty-ish pages. I’ll try it one more time before donating it to the library.

City of Jasmine by Deanna Raybourn
After reading Raybourn’s A Spear of Summer Grass, I decided it made sense to get City of Jasmine. The summary had intrigued me before I got into any Raybourn book (aviatrix finds out that her dead husband isn’t really dead). Being on sale helped make my decision a whole lot easier when it came down to actually ordering.

Dreaming Spies and The Murder of Mary Russell by Laurie R. King
Email marketing freaking works. I got an email from the Poisoned Pen about signed copies of The Murder of Mary Russell (I ordered a signed copy of Garment of Shadows from them years ago), and I impulse-bought it at 2AM. Then I found out that there’s another book in the series between GoS and MMRDreaming Spies. I drove over to my local B&N where it happened to be in stock.

Mockingbird and The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig
My local B&N doesn’t have a great track record of stocking the books I’m looking for unless they’re by Stephen King or another bestseller. But it makes sense to browse the shelves anyway if I’m already there. Both Mockingbird and The  Cormorant were on the shelf by some bookstore miracle. And not just any versions, but the new versions that match the first Miriam Black book already at home. I simply couldn’t help myself.