Posted in Movies, TV & Games

Women & the A-team

Image result for The A-teamThe A-team will always hold a special place in my heart. But it was a problematic show, to say the least. The female characters were shoehorned into one of two roles: plot device or love interest. More than once, those two roles were combined. There examples in every other episode, however I have two episodes in mind: “Children of Jamestown” and “Black Day at Bad Rock”. The A-team movie released in 2010 updated a lot of the story but the sexism remained.

“Children of Jamestown”–Season 1, Episode 2
Amy Allen tags along with the A-team as they rescue a young woman from a religious cult. Her presence doesn’t move the plot of the episode along, and the A-team would been just as capable of rescuing the young woman and subsequently taking down the Jamestown cult.

Amy’s role in the plot is to act like a delicate flower and thus enhance the A-team’s masculinity. She twice plays the decoy, praises the A-team’s abilities when they’re building a weapon, and is the foil to the A-team’s strength after they’re sentenced to death.

While Amy might not be a hardened soldier like the A-team, she’s an investigative journalist. She’d have to be pretty brave and capable to be successful in that career. So, yes, it’s unlikely she’s been in life or death experiences, but she’s probably been in some sticky situations before. Yet she turns into a wilting flower the moment things get tough.

“Black Day at Bad Rock”–Season 1, Episode 5
Dr. Maggie Sullivan is a doctor in the small town of Bad Rock when the A-team comes into town. She does three things in the episode: treat BA’s gunshot wound, call the military police on the A-team, and act as Hannibal’s love interest. She’s probably one of the most dynamic female characters in the series.

Dr. Sullivan plays a vital role in the episode by saving BA’s life. She patches him up the best she can and conducts a blood transfusion when a suitable donor arrives. Then she calls the police–albeit, a realistic response to treating a man with a gunshot wound–which is construed as negative since she’s turning in the show’s heroes.

Her actions are reasonable throughout the episode. She’s a strong woman who isn’t intimidated by a trio of dangerous fugitives. So what happens towards the end of the episode? She falls for Hannibal. In the episode’s final scenes, she’s seen in a romantic embrace with Hannibal and even kisses him. It undercuts the strength and capability that she showed earlier in the episode by leaving the audience with an image of her swooning over one of the heroes.

The A-Team (2010)
Captain Charissa Sosa is tasked with capturing the A-team after they escape from prison. She leads a team of soldiers across the globe in pursuit of men that the Army considered so dangerous that they sent all four of them to separate prisons in different parts of the country.

As a captain in the Army’s Defense Criminal Investigative Service, it’s easy to infer that Captain Sosa not only smart but a capable investigator. While she  isn’t a colonel like Colonel Lynch or Colonel Decker or a general like General Fulbright in the original series, the Army obviously believed she had the skills to catch fugitives that were once special forces.

However, Sosa is Face’s ex-girlfriend. When she’s about to have her soldiers capture the A-team, he distracts her by pulling her into a room, kissing her, and handcuffing her to a railing. That would qualify as assault. Not something a soldier in the military police would be happy about, whether the guy was her ex-boyfriend or not. Yet she facilitates the A-team’s escape at the end of the movie by kissing Face and passing him a key to the handcuffs.

***

The A-team influenced my writing. It still does to a degree. How could it not with all the hours I spent with Hannibal and Face and BA and Murdock?

I write strong women. Badass women. But for the longest time, she was always a daughter. Or a wife. She rose into her position thanks to the men in her life, and I can’t help seeing a connection with the female characters on The A-team.

I still like the A-team. It’s comfort food, like a big bowl of ice cream or a plate of chocolate fudge. Fun and delicious. But it’s important to acknowledge that it’s got its problematic aspects. Like calories. Or sexism.

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